Breast Cancer

Written by Norah Ana Burchardt

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) cancer is “a generic term for a large group of diseases characterised by the growth of abnormal cells beyond their usual boundaries that can then invade adjoining parts of the body and/or spread to other organs”. There are more than 200 types of cancers that can occur in any part of the human body. It is a genetic disease, which means that it is caused by alterations in the cells’ DNA, especially in genes that control cellular growth and division. Breast cancer (BC) is the neoplasm that has in the breast its primary site of growth. It is the most common type of cancer in women, excluding non-melanoma skin neoplasms, contributing to approximately 2.4 million new cancer cases worldwide in 2015. BC is the fifth most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths overall, causing more than half a million deaths worldwide in 2015. BC is also the most common cause of cancer deaths in women between 20 and 59 years of age.

Clinical Features

Pathogenesis

Comorbidities

Cellular Characteristics

Genetics

Treatment

Epidemiology

References

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